Holiday-shortened week doesn’t impact Facebook news & headlines

POLICY, PRIVACY & POLITICS

Feds expand probe into Facebook’s data sharing practices with Cambridge Analytica (Washington Post)

Representatives for the FBI, the SEC and the Federal Trade Commission have joined the Department of Justice in its inquiries about the two companies and the sharing of personal information of 71 million Americans. This is on the heels of Facebook recently releasing more than 700 pages of answers to lawmakers’ questions from the congressional hearings in April.

Walmart, P&G see their ads pulled under Facebook’s new political labeling policy (Marketing Dive)

Just a week after new disclosures for every ad, Facebook hit its first speed bump. The social media company initially pulled ads from Walmart and Procter & Gamble because they contained political themes but did not include a “paid for by” label now mandated under the platform’s policies. Walmart’s ad discussed “bringing jobs back” to America, while P&G’s was for LGBTQ pride and the marketer’s “commitment to inclusion.” Facebook later reversed its decisions.

NEW FUNCTIONALITY

Instagram rolls out tools for users to encourage ‘time well spent’ on the app (Social Media Today)

This week, Instagram announced that it’s rolling out its new ‘All Caught Up’ notifications to all users, which will inform you of when you’ve seen all the new content posted by profiles you follow. Also, a ‘Do Not Disturb’ feature is in prototype. This will allow users to shut off notifications from the apps for 30 minutes, one hour, two hours, eight hours, one day or until they’re turned back on manually.

Facebook adds Stories archive, enabling re-use of Stories posts (Social Media Today)

Facebook is expanding the roll out an archive option for Facebook Stories, the same as what Instagram provided for Instagram Stories late last year. For brands, that could provide more motivation to invest additional time and effort into Stories content. While the initial impetus for Stories was to create immediate, disappearing content, it can be difficult to justify spending too much time on them, knowing that they’ll be gone the next day.

NEWS YOU CAN USE

Facebook provides new tools to view all ads being run by pages (Social Media Today)

Not to be out-done by Twitter and its Ads Transparency Center launched this week, Facebook also released its ad transparency tool, providing new insight into the ads being run by any Page, at any given time. Two options now available:

  • View Active Ads – The first element enables you see all the ads that any Page is running across Facebook, Instagram and Messenger, as well as Facebook’s partner network.
  • More Page Information – The second component is Page information, which will enable users to view recent name changes, the date the Page was created, and more to come. This will be available on all Pages, even those that don’t advertise.

From a marketer’s perspective, you’ll now be able to view all the ads being run by competitors and get a better understanding of how they’re looking to boost appeal to their Facebook audience.

OTHER HEADLINES

Facebook Is killing off three under-performing apps acquired in recent years (Fortune)

Due to low usage, tbh, a platform for providing positive feedback to friends, Hello, a service that helped Android users combine information from Facebook with their phone contacts data, and a fitness app called Moves were all dropped this week.

Bacardi tests Instagram’s IGTV with fan-directed music video (Mobile Marketer)

Bacardi this week will create what it says is the first music video directed entirely by Instagram users in real time, according to a statement shared with Mobile Marketer. The “Live Moves” video will feature dancing duo Les Twins and premiere on IGTV, Instagram’s new long-form video hub, as part of the rum brand’s broader “Do What Moves You” campaign.

Facebook sets off its own fireworks in inadvertently blocking patriotic posts (multiple news outlets)

Example 1: A newspaper serially publishing the Declaration of Independence on social media this week got an unexpected surprise: Facebook had blocked one of the posts. The Liberty County Vindicator, a newspaper in southeastern Texas, had been posting portions of the Declaration on Facebook each day leading up to the Fourth of July. But the tenth installment of the foundational document didn’t post — and Facebook said it was because of hate speech.

“Somewhere in paragraphs 27-31 of the Declaration of Independence Thomas Jefferson wrote something that Facebook finds offensive,” Casey Stinnett, managing editor of the Vindicator, said on the paper’s website Monday. “The Vindicator received a notice from Facebook saying that the post ‘goes against our standards on hate speech.'” They later rescinded the block.

Example 2: Facebook was called out by country artist Wes Cook Band after it prevented the group from using the social network’s paid tools to promote its song “I Stand for the Flag.” The Nashville-based group released a video on Facebook Monday. They planned to promote it for 24 hours using the paid promotion tools that the social network provides. The request was initially approved and then rejected by Facebook, which cited the video’s “political content,” according to the band. Late Tuesday, Facebook told Fox News that the decision has been overturned.